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Art News From Around the Web

Bushwick Daily Spins Off New Print Quarterly

Bushwick Daily Spins Off New Print Quarterly

On Wednesday, Bushwick Daily editor-in-chief Katarina Hybenova announced that the five-year-old East Wlliamsburg/Bushwick/Ridgewood community news website will be launching a quarterly print magazine, Bushwick Notebook.

The 92-page inaugural issue is slated for release on June 1. It isn’t Bushwick Daily’s first foray into print, as the website has published a guide to Bushwick Open Studios the past two years, but Bushwick Notebook will replace that guide and go much deeper into art, fashion, entrepreneurship and culture in the neighborhood.

2015 seems like a strange time to get into the print magazine game, especially one focused on such a specific area, but Hybenova is a “print’s not dead” believer. In addition to simply wanting to make visually appealing physical object, the magazine, which will be available for free at local businesses throughout the neighborhood, will allow Bushwick Daily to reach more and different readers, as well as create more in-depth content that doesn’t exactly fit on the website.

“I think that some forms of print are dead and do better online (such as news) but great longer content, design and photography will live forever,” she wrote in an email to ANIMAL.

“Bushwick Daily has shaped over 5 years of our existence into a news website. Our readers prefer quick, short, super-timely pieces of news. Bushwick Notebook will not be like that at all,” Hybenova wrote. “Its slower magazine content will allow us to zoom onto the trends born in the neighborhood, and talk about them in a greater detail. ”

Hybenova also says that a print magazine is a good cultural fit for the neighborhood. She says that Bushwick Daily’s advertisers, mostly local businesses, value print advertising more than digital, and she projects that the magazine will be profitable. There’s also a thriving community of indie magazine publishers in Bushwick and Hybenova wanted to join them.

The magazine will feature interviews with Bushwick-based indie celebrities, profiles of interesting people and trends in the neighborhood, fashion spreads, and opinion columns. It will include work from regular Bushwick Daily contributors, as well as a feature from writer Vanessa Martir. Hybenova says that there will probably be a magazine-specific website in the future, but for now, the content will just exist in print.

(Photo: Michael Tapp)

The post Bushwick Daily Spins Off New Print Quarterly appeared first on ANIMAL.


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Author:Liam Mathews

Look at all the Amazing Photos This New Yorker Takes from His Roof

Look at all the Amazing Photos This New Yorker Takes from His Roof

Most photography requires at least a modicum of traveling, even if just to get to an interesting destination, but what’s amazing about Scott Matthews’s photographs is that he can capture the city’s vibrancy and diversity without even leaving his apartment in the Upper West Side.

8 (alt) - Traffic Over La Guardia Airport.jpg
ANIMAL reached out to Matthews after his multiple exposure shots of air traffic over New York City were featured in the West Side Rag. He provided us with a small collection of impressive photos that document the world as seen from 106th and Broadway.

1 - Astoria Station Sunrise (Three Furies)
“These were all shot from my apartment…looking north, east, up, down,” Matthews told ANIMAL via email. “One detail that I think is fun (and less-obvious) is how some specific landmarks become recurring characters.”

3 - Frederick Douglass Houses At Night
Check out the photos in the gallery above for more of his majestic shots.

(Photos: Scott Matthews)

The post Look at all the Amazing Photos This New Yorker Takes from His Roof appeared first on ANIMAL.


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Author:Prachi Gupta

New York As Weegee Saw It Vs. New York Today

New York As Weegee Saw It Vs. New York Today

The Daily Mail has some incredible photos taken by legendary street photographer Weegee. The photos are from the International Center for Photography’s archives and will soon be published in a new book called The Weegee Guide To New York, presented side-by-side with recent shots from the same spots.

Weegee was a photojournalist who captured gritty images of city life from the 1930s until his death in 1968. Born Ascher Fellig, he adopted the pseudonym “Weegee” — a phonetic spelling of Ouijia — because of his uncanny ability to show up at crime scenes moments after they were reported, often even before police. He is best known for his crime scene photography and originating the phrase “The Naked City.”

The post New York As Weegee Saw It Vs. New York Today appeared first on ANIMAL.


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Author:Liam Mathews

The Trains Are Always Late Because Riders Are Acting Like Boneheads

The Trains Are Always Late Because Riders Are Acting Like Boneheads

You’re not imagining it: people on the train are officially out of control, and it’s causing serious delays. The Post reports that 2,300 delays due to “unruly customers” were reported by conductors in January, an astounding 80% increase over the previous year. The number of delays due to jackassery was up 72% in October, 53% in November and 43% in December of last year compared to the same months in 2013. This is an extraordinary increase from April 2007, when there were only 271 delays due to unruly passengers.

So it’s a trend! What the hell, guys? Why is there an epidemic of fist-fighting and door-holding?

The 6 had the most delays caused by unruly riders, followed by the 2, 5, E, R. Somehow, the 7 and L were the most well-behaved.

The Post has a quote from a man who witnessed a drunken brawl on the A train that perfectly sums up the soul-deadening frustration of just trying to get from one place to another and being held up by people acting crazy for no good reason: “They were trying to punch each other through the doors. It was annoying because the train was held up.”

Before we rush to blame the epidemic of bad behavior on increased tension due to overcrowded trains and the MTA’s endless mismanagement and conductors not giving a fuck about riders, we need to look at ourselves. Why are so many of us resorting to violence? Why do we insist on holding the doors when we know, in our heart of hearts, another train will be coming in a few minutes? It’s up to us to prevent #DEBLASIOSNEWYORK from backsliding into the Bad Old Days. So please, next time somebody shoves you when you’re trying to get on a 5 train at rush hour, take a deep breath, remember that we’re all in this together, and keep your hands to yourself. And out of the train doors!

(Photo: Chris Cofer)

The post The Trains Are Always Late Because Riders Are Acting Like Boneheads appeared first on ANIMAL.


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Author:Liam Mathews

A Trans-Siberian Highway Could Connect New York to London

A Trans-Siberian Highway Could Connect New York to London

Russian Railways president Vladimir Yakunin wants to build a superhighway that would link North America, Asia and Europe through Russia in what would become the longest highway in the world. The proposal for the Trans-Eurasian Belt Development, first reported by the Siberian Times, would also bring a new train network along the Trans-Siberian Railway, oil and gas pipelines, and lay the groundwork for electric and water supplies to remote regions in Russia.

But what’s not clear, as CNN pragmatically notes, is pretty much anything about how such a massive undertaking would work. Not only would Russia have to convince all its neighbors that this is a good idea, but it would also have to spend “trillions of dollars” to do it.

CNN estimates that the road would span about 8,064 miles. That’s an “estimate” because the report doesn’t some pretty relevant details about the route, including how the road would traverse the Bering Strait that separates Alaska and Russia. CNN guesses that the road would start “some distance north of the town of Nome” in Alaska, a town that’s 520 miles from the next major roadway that lies in Fairbanks, Canada.

“This is an inter-state, inter-civilization, project,” Yakunin told the Siberian Times. “It should be an alternative to the current (neo-liberal) model, which has caused a systemic crisis. The project should be turned into a world ‘future zone’, and it must be based on leading, not catching, technologies.’ I dunno, something about the words “inter-civilization” and “future zone” in context of a Trans-Siberian roadway sounds eerily similar to this…

(Photo: Garrett Ziegler)

The post A Trans-Siberian Highway Could Connect New York to London appeared first on ANIMAL.


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Author:Prachi Gupta

Crowd Converges On Supreme Like A Pack Of Wild Hypebeasts

Crowd Converges On Supreme Like A Pack Of Wild Hypebeasts

Supreme, a streetwear brand that shouldn’t be nearly as popular as it is — for so many reasons — is currently selling a new collaboration it did with a Japanese apparel company you probably never heard of. Earlier on Thursday, there was a crowd of thirsty fans in Soho waiting to scoop up this pricey partnership. At about 11:15AM, things started getting a little hectic when this species of trend-swallowers tried to press into the retail space and bouncers started yelling, “Back up!” Resolute, the masses initially complied.

Then they again tried to push their way in, until they were scolded like children, again, bringing this entire scene back into its natural order.

(Photo/Video: Bucky Turco/ANIMALNewYork)

The post Crowd Converges On Supreme Like A Pack Of Wild Hypebeasts appeared first on ANIMAL.


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Author:Bucky Turco

NYC Growing, Upstate Boring As Fuck

NYC Growing, Upstate Boring As Fuck

New census estimates show small growth in New York City’s population last year, while a majority of upstate counties lost a small amount of population, WNYC reports.

Combined estimates from New York City’s five counties indicate that the city’s population grew 0.62% percent between July 2013 and July 2014 to 8.49 million people. The city’s New York State suburbs; Nassau and Suffolk Counties on Long Island; and Westchester and Rockland counties to the north also grew. Rockland’s 0.9% growth was the largest in the state, despite being the wackest of downstate counties.

Only 10 of the 51 upstate counties showed positive population growth. Saratoga County had the highest rate of 0.36%. Most counties posted population loss of just under 1%. Sullivan County had the highest rate of loss, shrinking 1.37% between 2013 and 2014. This is probably due to Sullivan County being a depressing place mostly populated by abandoned hotels.

(Photo: Andrew Wertz)

The post NYC Growing, Upstate Boring As Fuck appeared first on ANIMAL.


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Author:Liam Mathews

Using Jails as Homeless Shelters is Not a Good Strategy: The Jerome Murdough Case

Using Jails as Homeless Shelters is Not a Good Strategy: The  Jerome Murdough Case

Among the many counterproductive and illogical ways that a city can fill its jails and overburden its criminal justice system is by criminalizing things that homeless people do in order to survive. New York City, perhaps more than any other city, excels at spending money on arrests, prosecutions, and jails, rather than on programs that would address the root causes of homelessness and provide effective mental health or drug addiction treatments.

ANIMAL has obtained court transcripts for the one of the final court appearances of Jerome Murdough, a homeless and mentally ill veteran who was repeatedly arrested for sleeping inside the stairwells and hallways of public housing buildings last winter. Less than two weeks after this court appearance, Murdough was sent to Rikers Island on $2,500 bail and was, in the words of an anonymous city official, “baked to death” in a severely overheated cell. These transcripts reveal a shocking and deplorable lack of interest on the part of the prosecutor or the court in doing anything other than imposing another fruitless and costly jail sentence for someone whose crime consisted of finding a place to sleep inside during a snowstorm.

A veteran of the Marine Corps who suffered from schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and frequent epileptic seizures, Murdough had reportedly been arrested for trespassing eleven times before his last court appearance. Despite all of the money and time the city spent on those cases, it seems that they had done little to convince Murdough that he shouldn’t find a place to sleep indoors during the depths of winter. (As unpleasant as this year’s winter may have been, it should be remembered that last year’s was historically grueling.) In early February of last year, soon before his final arrest for which he was held on bail, Murdough was brought to the Manhattan criminal court building on four separate trespassing incidents, all of which took place during the winter months within the same East Harlem precinct. As with his other trespassing arrests, none of those four incidents involved violence, threats, theft, or anything more than a mentally ill homeless person hoping to briefly escape the cold.

Jerome_Murdough_m26_15
The transcript of that court appearance reveals that the Manhattan District Attorney’s office evidently thought that a long stretch in jail would teach Murdough a lesson about sleeping indoors during the winter: the Assistant DA recommended a jail sentence of three months. (That’s the same penalty one might get for, say, driving a minivan into a pedestrian while drunk and high, and then driving off.) Murdough’s attorney asked the court to place him in an alternative behavioral program instead, but Judge Neil Ross would only accept a disposition of ten days jail.

When people in the field of criminal justice talk about criminal punishments, they often talk about the need to deter future crimes. So it might have been a minimally competent thing for the police, the DA’s office, and the court to consider whether more arrests and more nights in jail could have somehow deterred Murdough from trespassing, or whether there wasn’t some better solution. But in all of its interactions with Murdough, the city failed to accomplish a single positive thing. If Murdough had survived his last stint at Rikers it’s impossible to say how long the cycle of arrests, prosecutions, incarceration, release, arrests, etc., for trespassing and other minor crimes might have continued.

In an interview with ANIMAL, Eric Tars of the National Law Center on Homelessness and Poverty said that problems associated with homelessness are most effectively addressed through interventions that take place entirely outside of the criminal justice system. “Pre-arrest diversion is most important. The fact that someone might be arrested for simply trying to survive, whether it’s taking shelter or sleeping outside, that behavior should not be criminalized in the first place.” Rather than waiting until a homeless person commits a criminal offense to intervene, Tars noted that it would be better to invest in a social service system with adequate housing and treatment services that could proactively address situations involving mental illness or addiction.

With a record high homeless population in the city, one would think that policy makers would be more inclined to tackle the underlying causes of homelessness, instead of continuing to criminally prosecute its symptoms. In December, Mayor de Blasio announced a $130 million program to support pretrial diversion programs and to help mentally ill inmates transition back into society. This program was funded in part by the Manhattan DA’s office, indicating that there is at least some interest among prosecutors’ offices in solving, rather than reflexively punishing, problems associated with homelessness and mental illness. But the city would be better served if the Mayor’s office also worked to reform police and social service practices in order to prevent homeless people and the mentally ill from needlessly entering the criminal justice system in the first place.

While New York already has an expansive shelter system, Tars noted that existing facilities may not be equipped to address the needs of all homeless New Yorkers. “For chronically homeless individuals with mental illness or addictions, the conditions in available shelter spaces may not be conducive to the needs of that individual.” Thus, for people with mental health or addiction problems, “their disabilities may prevent them from having access to beds that are otherwise theoretically available.” Providing adequate shelter and treatment for people with mental illnesses or addictions might be a challenging endeavor. As the Department of Investigation recently revealed, even the city’s existing family shelters are woefully ill-managed. But a robust shelter service program that can take in all homeless individuals would be cheaper, more effective, and far more humane than the current approach of relying on jails as temporary shelters.

The Comptroller’s office recently found that it costs almost $100,000 per inmate, per year to house someone at Rikers. If even a fraction of that money were diverted towards providing adequate shelter facilities and effective treatment services to prevent, rather than punish, offenses like trespassing, then the absurd cycle of arrests and prosecutions for crimes of necessity that marked the last months of Jerome Murdough’s life might be forestalled in the future.

Jerome Murdough Transcript by Lucas

(Photo: Matt Green)

The post Using Jails as Homeless Shelters is Not a Good Strategy: The Jerome Murdough Case appeared first on ANIMAL.


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Author:Lucas Anderson

NYPD Is Slowing Down With Stop-and-Frisks

NYPD Is Slowing Down With Stop-and-Frisks

While he predicts that the number of cops on the streets of New York is going to increase this year, Police Commissioner Bill Bratton says that the number of stop-and-frisks are going to decline.

Bratton told the New York Daily News that the NYPD will have one million fewer interactions with the public “based primarily on dramatic drops in stop-and-frisks, summonses and marijuana busts.” The drop in activity has not led to a spike in crime; in fact, the city currently faces a 10% drop in crime.

Going forward, officers are going to be encouraged to stop people based on “reasonable suspicion”:

“This is what the community is talking about: Don’t think of every black kid walking down the street as a potential criminal,” Bratton said.

“I’m not going to push cops to make stops,” Bratton continued. “They need reasonable suspicion. If they don’t see it happening, I’m not going to push them.”

The massive reduction by year’s end would come through cutting stop-and-frisk encounters by about 650,000, low-level pot busts by 40,000 and a similar huge drop in summonses for violations like public drinking, bicycling on the sidewalk and jaywalking.

Bratton hopes that the move will improve relations with communities of color, who are disproportionately targeted by stop-and-frisk. “The black population of the city, which has been the most dramatic beneficiary of reduced crime and violence, is the least satisfied community in the city (with the NYPD),” he said. “Why? Because of all that unnecessary enforcement activity. So we’re going in a different direction.”

(Photo: Dave Hosford)

The post NYPD Is Slowing Down With Stop-and-Frisks appeared first on ANIMAL.


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Author:Prachi Gupta

Today’s Pigeon

Today's Pigeon

Jackson, Murray Hill. (Photo: Bucky Turco/ANIMALNewYork)

The post Today’s Pigeon appeared first on ANIMAL.


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Author:Bucky Turco

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