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Art News From Around the Web

NYPD Casting Huge Dragnet In Its Investigation of Those White Flags On the Brooklyn Bridge

NYPD Casting Huge Dragnet In Its Investigation of Those White Flags On the Brooklyn Bridge

The NYPD really wants to find out who was responsible for installing two bleached-white American flags atop the Brooklyn Bridge, undetected, and is taking all sorts of measures to solve the mystery. NBC reports:

“Investigators are running license plate numbers, scouring social media, examining cellphone transmissions and collecting DNA as part of their investigation…”

The police are also still looking for a bunch of dudes:

In addition to all the leads detectives are running down, they’re still trying to identify a group of young men, one with a skateboard, who crossed the bridge around the time of the flag swap. They’re still considered persons of interest, but it’s not clear if it’s because they were involved or just may have been witnesses. 

(Photo: @NewsBell)

The post NYPD Casting Huge Dragnet In Its Investigation of Those White Flags On the Brooklyn Bridge appeared first on ANIMAL.


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Author:Bucky Turco

Parting Shot

Parting Shot

Nature happening at Brooklyn Botanical Garden. (Photo: @mksfca)

The post Parting Shot appeared first on ANIMAL.


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Author:Marina Galperina

Rhizome Offering Five $500 Internet Art Microgrants

Rhizome Offering Five $500 Internet Art Microgrants

Along with their “no string attached” $10,000 International Award for Net Art and curated commissions for New York-based artists, Rhizome has announced additional opportunities for artists who make internet-based work – Internet Art Microgrants.

In the spirit of our open award each year, we’d like the Rhizome community to consider a collection of compelling ideas for net-based works of art, so as to provide a modest injection that may help bring them to life. This program values dynamic concepts, and the feedback of an engaged peer audience.

Five awards of $500 will be largely determined by public vote, for those with user accounts on Rhizome. Submissions will comprise a simple 150-word statement and a single sketch or image. Rhizome community votes will narrow the selection down to a pool of 20 ideas, from which a guest jury will award five.

These awards will be announced, and featured, with our autumn program.

See the submission form and guidelines here. Rhizome is accepting proposals through August 22nd, 2014.

With the three initiatives, Rhizome nearing $40,000 in planned artist funding for 2014-2015.

The post Rhizome Offering Five $500
Internet Art Microgrants
appeared first on ANIMAL.


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Author:Marina Galperina

Scientists Hack Worm’s Brain

Scientists Hack Worm’s Brain

Scientists studying how connections in our brains foster senses have “hacked” into the brains of nematode worms by altering their DNA. In doing so, they were able to change the worms’ responses to salt and smell with new synaptic connections.

Schafer’s team injected DNA that codes for their protein into the gonads ofCaenorhabditis elegans nematode worms. When the next generation hatch ed, some worms expressed the new genes, giving rise to extra neural connections (see “A connection is made”). To ensure the introduced protein didn’t interact with other parts of the neuron, the team used the mouse version of the gene rather than the nematode’s usual invertebrate version.

To test their technique, the team inserted a connection between two unconnected neurons involved in the worms’ response to salt. In normal worms, salt increases the electrical activity in one neuron and decreases it in the other. But connecting them up synchronised the responses. “If one went up, the other did too,” says team member Ithai Rabinowitch at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Centre in Seattle. As a result, rewired worms were far less sensitive to changes in salt concentration.

The scientists then altered another connection associated with smell, which made the worms completely unable to detect odors. 

Researchers are hopeful that this technique could eventually be used to treat people with brain damage, “creating neural bypasses that miss out the damaged neurons.” We could even program organisms to have certain neurological traits, like worms that only ate bacteria that harm crops. Just wait till the anti-GMO crowd gets wind of that(Images: Wikipedia, New Scientist

The post Scientists Hack Worm’s Brain appeared first on ANIMAL.


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Author:Sophie Weiner

Russia To “Protect” College Students From Internet Porn, Torrents, Online Games, “Extremist” Dissent

Russia To “Protect” College Students From Internet Porn, Torrents, Online Games, “Extremist” Dissent

According a shockingly non-sarcastic headline on Russia Today, ”Moscow authorities promise to protect student campuses from internet porn.”

The limitations will be imposed in line with the recently introduced Russian laws on information, on protection of children, and on countering extremism.

As part the Moscow City Hall massive $20 million plan to equip college campuses and dorms with free unlimited Wi-Fi, the Kremlin propaganda channel is happy to inform you that there shall be no pornography.

There will also be no “torrent sharing programs and protocols used in online games” and nothing that ”denies family values and justifies unlawful behavior.” That, presumably, means nothing gay and no cursing (which was recently banned in all media and entertainment across Russia.) Other things — that fall into “unlawful” and “extremism” categories — are basically any dissent whatsoever, ever so casually alluded to in this RT report.

The college educated youth of Russia are basically fucked, unless they want to pay for their own modems. Even then, the new restrictions on information have fucked the internet. The Russian government already has the authority to block entire sites and social networks for any content it deems “extremist” (including criticism of the Russian government) and, after the massive “blogger law” crackdown on anonymity.

 

The post Russia To “Protect” College Students From Internet Porn, Torrents, Online Games, “Extremist” Dissent appeared first on ANIMAL.


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Author:Marina Galperina

Making Elegy for a Dead World, A Post-Apocalyptic Game That Riffs on British Romantic Poetry

Making Elegy for a Dead World, A Post-Apocalyptic Game That Riffs on British Romantic Poetry

ANIMAL’s feature Game Plan asks video game developers to share a bit about their process and some working images from the creation of a recent game. This week, we spoke with Ziba Scott of Popcannibal about Elegy for a Dead World, a game in which players concoct their own stories about long-gone civilizations.

Ziba Scott’s favorite definition of video games and the people who play them comes from Eric Zimmerman and Katie Salen’s book on game design, “Rules of Play” – “someone who’s willing to overcome an unnecessary obstacle.” In Elegy for a Dead World, that obstacle is writer’s block.

“Writing is a challenge,” Scott told ANIMAL. “Complete that challenge until you feel happy with it. There: it’s a game.”

In Elegy players walk from left to right, detouring only to explore the odd building, across the surfaces of deserted planets. The great civilizations that once inhabited these landscapes are long dead, and only their ruins remain. But there are no treasures to find or ghosts to fight in Elegy; instead, players simply try to determine what happened to the alien peoples whose detritus litters their abandoned homes.

Monuments lie broken, their pieces strewn across the ground. Nature encroaches on once-towering skyscrapers now crawling with vines. Who lived here? How did this happen? What did they lose? Developers Dejobaan Games and Popcannibal set the mood with beautiful visuals and haunting music, and you’re left to determine for yourself what you think occurred. You write your own histories in Elegy—literally.

You choose one of three play styles when you select a planet to explore: the game can help you write either a poem or a story, or you can write freeform. Choosing one of the first two options triggers prompts to appear within the level—things like “Fifty thousand years ago, long before ___, this land was home to a great people,” where you fill in the blank. As the story progresses the prompts contain fewer words and more blanks, giving your imagination room to take over. And of course there’s always the third option, where you insert whatever words you want anywhere in each level. How these stories take shape is ultimately up to you.

“There’s a million little things in every game. I don’t have to navigate this menu; I could walk away and go eat a sandwich. I choose to do this. But the big things — for Mega Man, it’s ‘I’m going to memorize these moves and beat this boss.’ For Elegy, it’s ‘I am going to think hard about this world and create something I’m proud of,’” Scott said. “I think that’s a novel, valuable thing.”

Elegy began life in August 2013 as a week-long game “jam” that would have been completed in five days or less. The initial pitch was “something very simple, walking from left to right, reading things,” according to Scott. But by the end of the week the handful of developers working on the game had an “epiphany,” that “this should be less about reading and more about writing.” They knew then that Elegy would be more than a work-week-long project, and it was months later still that they added writing prompts, cementing Elegy’s “gameplay,” such as it is.

Before that epiphany, when Elegy was going to be about reading stories rather than writing them, Scott and his cohorts designed a very specific narrative inspired by British romantic poets like William Blake and John Keats. “We wanted to tell those stories—in landscape,” Scott said. During the first days of development—as can be seen in some of the early sketches Scott sent to ANIMAL—they planned to spell these poems out “very clearly and very specifically.”

“We were going to give you all these objects you could read and inspect, tell you exactly how we interpreted these stories in these alien landscapes,” Scott said. “The attitude, the feeling, what these poems evoke was so inspiring to us…these poems are all about endings, end-times, the ends of lives, the ends of worlds, the ends of situations. They’re very isolating, or about isolation. And they’re about man’s struggle to find his place in nature.”

Letting players have their way with those themes was eye-opening. Initially many didn’t take it seriously, and there will always be those who default to dick jokes. But as the game’s art, music and writing prompts have improved, players’ responses have become more and more serious. “So much of it’s mood,” Scott said. Each planet is designed to tell a story, and it’s up to players to interpret what that story is, for better or worse.

“I think I’m learning a lesson through this whole process about giving people blanks to fill in—giving people some leeway to do their own stuff. That me spelling things out exactly in everything isn’t always the best,” Scott said. “When the movie ends, don’t actually say whether the main character lived or died, just let the person wonder about that for a while, because they want to.” And in the case of Elegy, let them write the ending for themselves.

Elegy for a Dead World is in development now for Windows, Mac and Linux PCs. The developers hope to have it done by the fall, but make no promises. Learn more at Dejobaan.com/elegy.

The post Making Elegy for a Dead World, A Post-Apocalyptic Game That Riffs on British Romantic Poetry appeared first on ANIMAL.


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Author:Michael Rougeau

Dude Exaggerates His “World’s Biggest Dick Drawing” Kickstarter

Dude Exaggerates His “World’s Biggest Dick Drawing” Kickstarter

“Whether it is a terrible sketch on a bar napkin or a beautiful painting on a canvas; a dick drawing is a dick drawing,” artist Alex Wong states on his Kickstarter page. Wong has one mission — to draw the world’s biggest dick. He’s asking for $100 dollars to complete the project. Each dollar will fund one inch of the penis drawing, for a whopping 100 inches! Wait, what?

There are certainly larger depictions of dicks already in existence, although there is presently no listing in the Guinness Book Of World Records for the category. In the wake of the Potato Salad IndieGogo-gate, this appears to be a crowd-sourced feat of bureaucracy, more than art.

But wong wants to use nice printing paper that costs a lot, so the recent college grad needs your help to pay for it. “If the goal isn’t met, I’d still love to head out to an abandoned road or anything that is straight for quite a while, and either do a huge chalk dick or maybe one of those spray paint dicks with a surveying spray can that sprays while upside down,” Wong told the Daily Dot. We’d recommend checking out our analysis of dick graffiti through history before you decide how much to donate. (Image: Kickstarter)

 

The post Dude Exaggerates His “World’s Biggest Dick Drawing” Kickstarter appeared first on ANIMAL.


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Author:Sophie Weiner

Spectacle Goes MAD: Strange Little Radical Movie Theater Takes Over a Museum

Spectacle Goes MAD: Strange Little Radical Movie Theater Takes Over a Museum

Through a nondescript door on South 3rd Street, for $5 a seat, you can catch some of the strangest, rarest, most controversial films ever made, every night at Spectacle. Starting July 24th through August 28th, the collectively-run volunteer-staffed screening space in Williamsburg is taking part in “The MAD Biennial” at the Museum of Arts and Design in Manhattan. The screenings are split into eleven programs — six extremely rare, internationally-sourced 35mm prints of favorites and five programs with an in-house “remix” of live scores. As long time fans of Spectacle, we’re psyched for this series.

ANIMAL spoke to Jon Dieringer (Screen Slate, Electronic Arts Intermix, Spectacle), responsible for “Strong-Thing” and the 35mm programming/print sourcing for the series. Tune in for highlights of the “Spectacle with a budget,” such as Sally Potter’s The Gold Diggers, Jackie Raynal’s Deux Fois“Nirvana Night” and Deadlock, showing for the first time in 35mm in the US — “an extremely rare, pristine print,” with a soundtrack from Can.


Spectacle Presents: Nirvana Night (w/ special musical guest TBA) Thursday, July 31, 2014 – 7:00 pm

Who runs Spectacle? How would you describe the community around it?

The space opened in earnest in late 2010. I’ve been involved since early 2011. There are about four of us who came on around the same time (Greg Eggebeen, Steve Macfarlane, Mark Freado and I) who are still holding it down along with many others who have come on in the meantime and taken on huge responsibilities. About a year after we had come on, we really pushed it as a collective and started actively bringing in new volunteers. I’d guess about 30 of us now — programming, cutting trailers, designing posters, and working the booth. We don’t have any credo or system or organization. There are no clear roles, and the question of whether there’s a hierarchy isn’t really resolved.

Spectacle appeals to people who are avid devotees of the moving image and yet don’t fit in with the dominant model of white, male nerds supporting a classical canon that favors Hollywood, with all its prejudices, and other, mostly western European male filmmakers, which are generally conservative in their structures and aesthetics. Meanwhile, this reinforces boundaries between “cinema,” “artworld,” and “experimental film,” which are rupturing faster than some can keep up with. Basically, I think we’re people who love movies but don’t feel like drinking the Kool-Aid — and here we’ve all found each other at this tiny bodega cinema.


El Dependiente (1960) Dir. Leonardo Favio Thursday, August 14, 2014 – 7:00 pm

What are you most excited about in the MAD program?

 Those two programs aside, I’m most excited about Deadlock, which is the most insane can’t-miss thing, because it’s never shown here before on 35mm ever. I’m told it probably won’t ever again. It’s a phenomenal movie — this minimalist German acid western with a soundtrack by Can, actually the first thing they recorded with Damo Suzuki on vocals. Director Roland Klick, who retired from filmmaking inthe 1980s to self-imposed seclusion and turned 75 this 4th of July, has credited Spectacle with “discovering” him. (All the English-language synopsis of his work, including a new documentary about him, were sourced from Spectacle.) This is the only projection-worthy print in existence, and they’re essentially releasing it as a favor to Spectacle.


Deadlock (1970), Dir. Roland Klick Friday, August 1, 2014 – 7:00 pm

Also there are two movies that are absolute masterpieces that are in the series just because they look stunning and have both rarely shown here: El Dependiente, which is an Argentinian proto-Eraserhead movie about the anxiety of courtship. The parallels are stunning but it also has some nods to to-the-moment contemporary American cinema like The Graduate and Mean Streets. And then there’s The White Reindeer, which is the most beautiful horror film ever made.


The White Reindeer (1952) Dir. Erik Blomberg Thursday, August 28, 2014 – 7:00 pm

And finally, Panelstory, which kicks off the series and is the first film I booked, because it’s more or less the first film Spectacle ever showed and aside from Daisies, Vera Chytilova is still totally under recognized. We actually booked it just before she sadly passed away on March 12, so it’s now also kind of a tribute screening — as far as I know, the only one planned in NYC.

Where are you getting this stuff? What is the general programming process of the theater and how is it different for the program at MAD?

The programming process at Spectacle is pretty fast and loose and allows us to be really agile. If someone wants to show something, we just do our best to determine the rights-holder, get in touch, explain the space, and ask for permission. Since we’re usually just showing stuff off a computer, we generally don’t have to deal with shipping prints or DCP drives and encryption and stuff. Someone will mail us a disc or transfer a file. A number of us are qualified in video preservation so without getting super nerdy (…which I totally could if you want!), we’ll do certain magic tricks to give video transfers of stuff the best possible presentation quality. That said, honestly sometimes people just download shit off the internet and show it at the theater. Collectivity!

For instance, when I did this Marguerite Duras series a few months ago, I got in touch with her estate. Her son said the place sounded cool and he didn’t want any money. He sent me DVDs. I made high quality rips of them (though it sounds counter-intuitive, you can definitely improve the quality of a disc by ripping it), wrote up some text, polished up the subtitles, made a pamphlet in inDesign with the text to promote the series, printed them up and dropped them around town, and then worked the booth for the screenings. The whole process took about eight weeks between the idea and the final showing.

Sourcing prints for the MAD series has pretty much taken me all year. We started in February. I wanted the program to represented the international and gender-balanced scope of the space and the stuff that we’ve been more or less unique — but definitely not singular, except in the case of Roland Klick — in championing. It’s about what’s available, a process of detective work where you’re looking for both rights and a print. And then negotiating fees and trying to pull in favors with consulates to cover shipping costs. The detective work involves a lot of programmers. I knew two programmers who had done Vera Chytilova and Leonardo Favio retrospectives about 15 years ago, so I wrote to them to ask if they could point me in the right direction. Funny enough, the rights holders of these titles are constantly changing hands. And it’s really expensive once you’re doing it at a legit space. The difference between being like, “Hey, can we show this DVD we already have at Spectacle? — Sure thing!” and doing a proper presentation on 35mm is $2,000, a lot of paper work, and a lot of cc’ing people. Showing movies is pretty intense.

What is the difference between watching these films in the original 35 mm format and the most common one available?

There’s no way of legitimately enhancing the level of detail and beauty of seeing a film in its original format. A 4K scan is better than a 2K scan, but it’s not as good as no scan. Beyond that, there are basic physiological differences in how our eyes register film — the mechanical progression of 24-pictures-per-second, and video. This is particularly apparent with single-frame work like flicker films, which lose a lot when they’re transferred from 24fps to the NTSC video standard of 30fps. (Not as big a deal now with HD video, which is 23.97 fps…) Because film is a physical object, its subject to physical defects, and I think you read a story of a film in those. Even though film is reproducible and there are good prints and bad prints, watching a film is pretty much unquestionably seeing “the original,” which gets trickier when you’re dealing with video. And there is so much technical intervention that goes into the film-to-video process — whether it’s DCP or HDCAM or Digibeta or whatever. So to me, at Spectacle, the trade-off has always been accessibility, affordability, and community. And I think that’s legit. But a lot of times I’ve just sat there dreaming they were in 35mm, haha.


The Gold Diggers (1983) Dir. Sally Potter Thursday, August 21, 2014 – 7:00 pm

But before video projection was viable, a lot of times stuff that was shot on 35mm would circulate on 16mm to cine-clubs or universities and stuff. Most times independent filmmakers couldn’t afford to shoot 35mm. But then you get those kind of black sheep movies where the filmmakers actually did shoot 35mm, but generally would show in the kinds of venues that did 16mm projection. Deux Fois and The Gold Diggers are perfect examples of that — and since 35mm prints are overseas, and it saves you about $2,000 on shipping costs, most people would show a 16mm reduction print. So Sally Potter actually talks about this in Scott MacDonald’s A Critical Cinema.  

The first time I saw The Gold Diggers projected in 16mm, I nearly died. I felt as if all the work that had gone into creating this pristine 35mm image might as well never have existed. I even wished that I’d never allowed it to go onto 16mm, though I didn’t have the contractual power to prevent that. I suppose most of those few who have seen it have seen it on 16mm.

Jackie encouraged us to show this 16mm print of Deux Fois for free, but I really wanted to go all-out and get the 35mm if it was at all conceivable, which she eventually really got behind. I think she was just surprised that someone actually cared.

Originally we were just going to show that but then she also encouraged us to get ahold of Serge Bard’s Fun and Game(s) for Everyone, which is insane looking, and I feel like I’m definitely going to be watching it for the first time. Zanzibar were, essentially, a bunch of crazy artists in their late teens and early 20′s who were making movies on acid. And Henri Alekan, this dignified old-school French cinematographer who shot Cocteau movies, ended up shooting and processing Fun and Game(s) using this literally singular high-contrast style. It ends up looking like the kind of Waking Life digital rotoscoping stuff. 


Spectacle Premieres: State of Emergence, Strong-Thing Friday, July 25, 2014 – 7:00 pm

Are you anticipating more expanding efforts for Spectacle?

I think we’ll have to see. This was a really great opportunity. Other offers are usually tied to some kind of marketing thing, which we try to ignore, if not destroy. But mostly, I think we’re just interested in staying in our own space.

What are some of the most memorable/controversial screenings you remember at Spectacle?

I can remember this one night my colleague Rebecca Cleman and I did with Tommy Turner — an amazing, under-represented artist and Super 8 filmmaker probably best known for his close personal and creative association with David Wojnarowicz. (He’s also repped by David’s gallery, PPOW.) So, Tommy is super into heavy metal and Satan and one of his films has extremely graphic depictions of heroin use intercut with maiming lab rat corpses in such a way that he appears to be harming live rats. And that became this big thing where both audiences and Spectacle people were upset and wanted to have a Conversation. But it was very bold to share this work, and of course some people responded to it very well.

But actually, our audience is down for whatever, and I think we generally put things into an appropriate context, whether it’s challenging to personal, political, racial, ethical, or aesthetic sensibilities. Controversy manifests itself as in-fighting over whether something is or isn’t appropriate for the space in terms of it being something that’s already well-represented at other venues.

The post Spectacle Goes MAD: Strange Little Radical Movie Theater Takes Over a Museum appeared first on ANIMAL.


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Author:Marina Galperina

Artist Goes Off Meds For Performance

Artist Goes Off Meds For Performance

Brooklyn artist Marni Kotak, who stirred up controversy in 2011 by giving birth at a gallery, will now wean herself off the psychoactive medications she started taking during her postpartum depression. For six weeks, Kotak will sit in a gallery while taking notes on her fluctuating feelings as she withdraws.

The artist’s performance is intended as criticism of the pharmaceutical and psychiatric industries. Kotak was placed into a psych ward after her depression began, where she said “they just didn’t have time to help me.” The artist thinks there is an over-reliance on drugs as treatment for mental illness and told The Daily Beast that “psychiatry may have manufactured the growing epidemic of mental illness in the country.”

This is a highly dangerous experiment. The risk of relapse when getting off prescribed medication for depression is high and experimenting with mental health is simply not a privilege afforded to most people. One in four adults in the United States suffers from a diagnosable mental illness in a given year. Meanwhile, 13.4% of Americans have no health insurance, and many more have no mental health coverage. The meds that Kotak is giving up simply aren’t available to most of those who need them; 25% of the homeless population suffers from diagnosable mental illnesses and 48% list mental illness as the reason they’re on the streets. Projects like this one which seem to imply that mental illness is a scam made up by doctors — and shame those who need medicine to function — perpetuate the stigmatization of these illnesses that so many suffer from. I guess we’ll have to see how it plays out. (Photo: Gatis Gribusts)

The post Artist Goes Off Meds For Performance appeared first on ANIMAL.


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Author:Sophie Weiner

Why I Went To Eric Garner’s Funeral

Why I Went To Eric Garner’s Funeral

The block on Bergen Street in Brooklyn was already filling by 5PM on Wednesday night. People were gathering for the funeral of Eric Garner, the 43-year-old man who died last week after an NYPD plain clothes officer was captured on video putting the Staten Island father of six in a chokehold.

I asked everyone one simple question: Why are you here?














(Photos: Amy K. Nelson/ANIMALNewYork)

The post Why I Went To Eric Garner’s Funeral appeared first on ANIMAL.


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Author:Amy K. Nelson

The NYPD Increases Arrests for Sex-Related Crimes On the Subway

The NYPD Increases Arrests for Sex-Related Crimes On the Subway

Cops appear to be finally cracking down on sexual harassment on the subway. So far this year, 128 people have been arrested, compared to 104 last year. The NYPD credits the 23% increase to having more plainclothes officers on the train.

“Increased enforcement is a good step,” Debjoni Roy, the deputy director of the street harassment non-profit Hollaback! told Daily News. “It means this isn’t being ignored and those of us on the receiving end of harassment and abuse are being heard.”

Recently published subway crime data shows 3,000 reported cases of sex-related crimes in the last five years, most of them for “forcible touching.” Last month, the Daily News created a map detailing the types of arrests throughout the transit system and discovered that most of the sexual harassment takes place at Grand Central. (Photo: @michael-semensohn)

The post The NYPD Increases Arrests for Sex-Related Crimes On the Subway appeared first on ANIMAL.


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Author:Sophie Weiner

Today’s Pigeon

Today’s Pigeon

Arnold, Hell’s Kitchen. (Photo: Bucky Turco/ANIMALNewYork)

The post Today’s Pigeon appeared first on ANIMAL.


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Author:Sophie Weiner

PASSAGES: Michael Schmidt (1945–2014)


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PICKS: Genieve Figgis


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PICKS: “DTR”


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